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Ponca City Information

Ponca City History

Ponca Military Academy

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The Ponca Military Academy

Flagpole Only Remains of Ponca Military School Ponca Military Academy Memorial Park

Established in 1940 by the late Colonel William V. Cox and his wife, Blanche, Ponca Military Academy stood for 34 years as an institution dedicated to the growth and advancement of young men. With 150 students enrolled in its peak years, the PMA played a big part in helping educate not only young men from Oklahoma, but throughout the country.

Eighteen students entered Ponca Military Academy when it opened its doors in September 1940, for its first school term, enrollment continued to grow through the years with enrollment sometimes over 120 cadets with a waiting list. But, the last year the academy was open, there were only 68 cadets enrolled.

The academy campus of 56 acres was located about one and a half miles east of the city with an administration building, barracks and gymnasium on bluffs overlooking the Arkansas River valley. Parade ground, athletic fields, tennis courts and a play ground were also located on the campus.

The junior school of the military academy included cadets in grades through the sixth. The middle school was for boys in the seventh, eighth and ninth grades, while the last three years of high school are included in the upper school.

All schools of the Academy were fully accredited by the Oklahoma Department of Education. Classes were small and special attention was given to speech training and remedial reading.

A full program of athletics was provided for each age group, and included fall, winter and spring sports.

Each cadet, regardless of age, had the opportunity of becoming a member of the National Rifle Association. An indoor range had been constructed at the school, and in a safe, well-lighted and naturally sound-proofed spot the boys were able to build habits of safe handling firearms. Many medals and trophies were won by PMA cadets each year.

Special training in music could be secured. The drum and bugle corps and crack drill platoon were familiar sights in cities in Oklahoma and southern Kansas, where they are often invited to play and march.